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    Our legacy to future generations

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    mudra

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    Our legacy to future generations

    Post  mudra on Tue Sep 18, 2012 5:21 am


    This is a place for reflection on the impact we humans are leaving on our environment for our future generations .

    I would like be highlighted here the signs of our ignorance as well those that show our awakening in these matters and how we both as a collective and individually maybe able to change the course of events.


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    Re: Our legacy to future generations

    Post  mudra on Tue Sep 18, 2012 5:27 am




    The Great Pacific Garbage Patch

    Capt. Charles Moore of the Algalita Marine Research Foundation first discovered the Great Pacific Garbage Patch — an endless floating waste of plastic trash. Now he's drawing attention to the growing, choking problem of plastic debris in our seas:

    watch video : Arrow http://blog.ted.com/2009/02/24/capt_charles_mo/

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    Re: Our legacy to future generations

    Post  mudra on Tue Sep 18, 2012 5:40 am

    A Sea Change
    Imagine a world without fish


    It’s a frightening premise, and it’s happening right now. A Sea Change follows the journey of retired history teacher Sven Huseby on his quest to discover what is happening to the world’s oceans. After reading Elizabeth Kolbert’s “The Darkening Sea,” Sven becomes obsessed with the rising acidity of the oceans and what this “sea change” bodes for mankind. His quest takes him to Alaska, California, Washington, and Norway as he uncovers a worldwide crisis that most people are unaware of. Speaking with oceanographers, marine biologists, climatologists, and artists, Sven discovers that global warming is only half the story of the environmental catastrophe that awaits us. Excess carbon dioxide is dissolving in our oceans, changing sea water chemistry. The more acidic water makes it difficult for tiny creatures at the bottom of the food web to form their shells. The effects could work their way up to the fish 1 billion people depend upon for their source of protein.

    http://www.aseachange.net/about.htm

    Recipient of the NOAA 2010 Environmental Hero Award

    Watch this documentary on Vimeo:

    Arrow http://vimeo.com/7804554


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    Re: Our legacy to future generations

    Post  mudra on Tue Sep 18, 2012 5:46 am

    Runoff and Pollution

    Although the ocean covers two-thirds of the surface of the Earth, it is surprisingly vulnerable to human influences such as overfishing, pollution from run-off, and dumping of waste from human activity. This kind of pollution can have serious economic and health impacts by killing marine life and damaging habitats and ecosystems. Toxins from pesticides, fertilizers, and other chemicals used on farms contaminate nearby rivers that flow into the ocean, which can cause extensive loss of marine life in bays and estuaries leading to the creation of dead zones. The dumping of industrial, nuclear and other waste into oceans was legal until the early 1970's when it became regulated; however, dumping still occurs illegally everywhere.

    The Cycle of Insanity: The Real Story of Water

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=espNKMCZ1kU


    The Cycle of Insanity: The Real Story of Water is a short, animated film made by a collaboration of creative and dedicated volunteers at the Surfrider Foundation. Several local Surfrider Foundation chapters combined their talents and funds to create the film -- and then actor Zuleikha Robinson of Lost, generously agreed to narrate it.

    The premise of the film is that the water cycle we all learned about in the 4th grade has been dramatically altered over time, leaving us with a broken system that wastes water and energy, pollutes our natural waterways, harms critical marine life, and poorly deals with flooding and other water management problems.

    The film serves to take a holistic look at water management, highlight controversial problems, and suggest solutions that integrate multiple economic and environmental benefits. The intended audience includes entire communities: from homeowners and the general public, to public agencies and elected government officials.

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    Re: Our legacy to future generations

    Post  mudra on Tue Sep 18, 2012 12:04 pm

    Stephen Palumbi: Following the mercury trail

    There's a tight and surprising link between the ocean's health and ours, says marine biologist Stephen Palumbi . He shows how toxins at the bottom of the ocean food chain find their way into our bodies, with a shocking story of toxic contamination from a Japanese fish market. His work points a way forward for saving the oceans' health — and humanity's

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=D6nf8T58zdY


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    Re: Our legacy to future generations

    Post  mudra on Tue Sep 18, 2012 5:02 pm

    A Fall From Freedom

    The untold story behind the captive whale and dolphin industry


    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cTtBHiNjc74


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    Re: Our legacy to future generations

    Post  mudra on Fri Sep 21, 2012 8:53 am




    Ocean Dumping

    Governments world-wide were urged by the 1972 Stockholm Conference to control the dumping of waste in "their oceans" by implementing new laws. The United Nations met in London after this recommendation to begin the Convention on the Prevention of Marine Pollution by Dumping of Wastes and Other Matter which was implemented in 1975. The International Maritime Organization was given responsibility for this convention and a Protocol was finally adopted in 1996, a major step in the regulation of ocean dumping.

    Waste in the Ocean

    EPA seeks to clean up DDT-tainted site off Palos Verdes Peninsula
    The agency in 1996 declared about 17 square miles of ocean a Superfund site . Its proposal includes placing a cap of silt and sand over the most contaminated 320 acres. The federal Environmental Protection Agency on Thursday proposed spending at least $36 million to clean up the world's largest deposit of banned pesticide DDT , which lies 200 feet underwater off the Palos Verdes Peninsula. Montrose Chemical Corp., which was based near Torrance, released 110 tons of DDT and 10 tons of toxic PCBs into the sewers from 1947 through 1971. The chemicals then flowed into the Pacific. By Jeff Gottlieb - June 12, 2009

    The most toxic waste material dumped into the ocean includes dredged material, industrial waste, sewage sludge, and radioactive waste. Dredging contributes about 80% of all waste dumped into the ocean, adding up to several million tons of material dumped each year. Rivers, canals, and harbors are dredged to remove silt and sand buildup or to establish new waterways. About 20-22% of dredged material is dumped into the ocean. The remainder is dumped into other waters or landfills and some is used for development. About 10% of all dredged material is polluted with heavy metals such as cadmium, mercury, and chromium, hydrocarbons such as heavy oils, nutrients including phosphorous and nitrogen, and organochlorines from pesticides. Waterways and, therefore, silt and sand accumulate these toxins from land runoff, shipping practices, industrial and community waste, and other sources. When these materials find their way into the ocean, marine organisms suffer toxic effects and seafood is often contaminated.



    When "pure" dredged material is dumped into the ocean, fisheries suffer adverse affects such as unsuccessful spawning in herring and lobster populations where the sea floor is covered in silt.




    Industrial Waste

    In the 1970s, 17 million tons of industrial waste was legally dumped into the ocean. In the 1980's, 8 million tons were dumped including acids, alkaline waste, scrap metals, waste from fish processing, flue desulphurization, sludge, and coal ash.

    Sewage Sludge

    If sludge from the treatment of sewage is not contaminated by oils, organic chemicals and metals, it can be recycled as fertilizer for crops.

    It is cheaper for treatment centers to dump this material into the ocean, particularly if it is chemically contaminated. The UN policy is that properly treated sludge from cities does not contain enough contaminants to be a significant cause of eutrophication (an increase in chemical nutrients—typically compounds containing nitrogen or phosphorus—in an ecosystem) or to pose any risk to humans if dumped into the ocean. The peak of sewage dumping was 18 million tons in 1980, a number that was reduced to 12 million tons in the 1990s.


    Radioactive Waste

    Radioactive waste is also dumped in the oceans and usually comes from the nuclear power process, medical use of radioisotopes, research use of radioisotopes and industrial uses. The difference between industrial waste and nuclear waste is that nuclear waste usually remains radioactive for decades. The protocol for disposing of nuclear waste involves special treatment by keeping it in concrete drums so that it doesn't spread when it hits the ocean floor. The dumping of radioactive material has reached a total of about 84,000 terabecquerels (TBq), a unit of radioactivity equal to 1012 atomic disintegrations per second or 27.027 curies. Curie (Ci) is a unit of radioactivity. One curie was originally defined as the radioactivity of one gram of pure radium. In 1953, scientists agreed that the curie would represent exactly 3.7 x 1010 atomic disintegrations per second, or 37 gigabecquerels (GBq), this being the best estimate of the activity of a gram of radium. The unit is named for Pierre and Marie Curie who discovered radium. The high point of nuclear waste dumping was in 1954 and 1962, but this nuclear waste only accounts for 1% of the total TBq that has been dumped in the ocean. The concentration of radioactive waste in the concrete drums varies as does the danger to marine life and humans.

    The Problems with Ocean Dumping

    Although policies on ocean dumping in the recent past took an "out of sight- out of mind" approach, it is now known that accumulation of waste in the ocean is detrimental to marine and human health. Another unwanted effect is eutrophication. A biological process where dissolved nutrients cause oxygen-depleting bacteria and plants to proliferate creating a hypoxic, or oxygen poor, environment that kills marine life. In addition to eutrophication, ocean dumping can destroy entire habitats and ecosystems when excess sediment builds up and toxins are released. Although ocean dumping is now managed to some degree, and dumping in critical habitats and at critical times is regulated, toxins are still spread by ocean currents. Alternatives to ocean dumping include recycling, producing less wasteful products, saving energy and changing the dangerous material into more benign waste.

    According to the United Nations Group of Experts on the Scientific Aspects of Marine Pollution , the amount of ocean dumping actually brings in less pollution than maritime transportation, atmospheric pollution, and land based pollution like run-off. However, when waste is dumped it is often close to the coast and very concentrated.

    Waste dumped into the ocean is categorized into the black list, the gray list, and the white list. On the black list are organohalogen compounds, mercury compounds and pure mercury, cadmium compounds and pure cadmium, any type of plastic, crude oil and oil products, refined petroleum and residue, highly radioactive waste, any material made for biological or chemical warfare.

    The gray list includes water highly contaminated with arsenic, copper, lead, zinc, organosilicon compounds, any type of cyanide, flouride, pesticides, pesticide by-products, acids and bases, beryllium, chromium, nickel and nickel compounds, vanadium, scrap metal, containers, bulky wastes, lower level radioactive material and any material that will affect the ecosystem due to the amount in which it is dumped.

    The white list includes all other materials not mentioned on the other two lists. The white list was developed to ensure that materials on this list are safe and will not be dumped on vulnerable areas such as coral reefs.

    Issues associated with Ocean Dumping

    Incineration has been used to control dangerous chemical waste being dumped into the Ocean. This practice began in 1969 and became very popular by the late 1970's. By the mid-1980's, about 100,000 tons of waste was incinerated before it was dumped. This process has been studied to determine whether the practice is safe and effective. When dangerous waste is burned, it can produce smoke full of hazardous chemicals and may possibly spill into the ocean. After thorough evaluation, it was determined in 1989 that incineration is not a viable method of reducing the amount of waste dumped into the ocean because of the smoke released, and therefore, almost all the waste burning vessels were grounded. The Protocol of 1996 banned burning waste at sea altogether.

    The majority of nuclear waste in the ocean comes from six submarine reactors, one nuclear icebreaker reactor, and damaged nuclear fuel in the Kara Sea. The rest of the nuclear material in the ocean is solid nuclear waste in concrete drums.

    Although some claim the risk to human health is small, the long-term affects of nuclear dumping are not known, and some estimate up to 1,000 deaths in the next 10,000 years as a result of evaporated nuclear waste.

    In 1995, a Global Waste Survey and the National Waste Management Profiles inventoried waste dumped worldwide to determine what countries were dumping waste and how much was going into the ocean. Countries that exceeded an acceptable level would then be assisted in the development of a workable plan to dispose of their waste.

    The impact of a global ban on ocean dumping of industrial waste was determined in the Global Waste Survey Final Report the same year. In addition to giving the impact for every nation, the report also concluded that the unregulated disposal of waste, pollution of water, and buildup of materials in the ocean were serious problems for a multitude of countries. The report also concluded that dumping industrial waste anywhere in the ocean is like dumping it anywhere on land. The dumping of industrial waste had reached unacceptable levels in some regions, particularly in developing countries that lacked the resources to dispose of their waste properly. Enforcement of regulations was also a problem in these areas, so it was necessary to assist the countries in the implementation of a waste disposal strategy.

    Areas where high levels of illegal dumping occur are commonly areas that have no way of implementing a better strategy. A global ban on ocean dumping is not enough to eliminate the practice, and it will require all governments to have a workable plan to reduce the amount of waste, recycle some waste, and learn how to modify waste that is dumped into the ocean so it is less harmful.

    Take Action Against Ocean Pollution

    http://marinebio.org/oceans/ocean-dumping.asp

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    Re: Our legacy to future generations

    Post  mudra on Fri Sep 21, 2012 9:01 am

    Does the marine biosphere mix the ocean?

    A group of oceanographers led by W.K. Dewar of Florida State University argue that the swimming action of fish and other marine organisms may play a critical role in driving ocean currents. If true, large-scale over-fishing or the collapse of the marine food chain due to pollution or ocean acidification may cause significant changes in ocean currents--and Earth's climate.



    The Meridional Overturning Circulation (MOC) or Thermohaline Circulation is a well-known feature of the ocean circulation. In the Atlantic, the Gulf Stream current forms a portion of the MOC. Gulf Stream waters flow to the region near Greenland, where an input of fresh, denser water from melting ice and river run-off creates a downward flow of water that then moves southward along the ocean bottom towards the Equator. This deep water eventually returns to the surface in the mid-Atlantic to complete a cell of the MOC. Scientists have long thought that the energy needed to drive the MOC came from winds and tides--about two terrawatts of energy (Munk and Wunsch, 1998). However, Dewar et al. show that the mechanical energy added to the ocean by the swimming action of whales is about 1% of this total, and the swimming action of other marine organisms (primarily zooplankton) adds up to 50% of this total--one terrawatt of energy. While the authors admit that their calculations may have large errors, this research shows that marine life may have a heretofore unappreciated large impact on Earth's climate. Our climate is intimately connected to the sun, life on land, life in the ocean, and human activities in an incredibly complex web of interconnections. It is our challenge to understand this system, even as we change it and it changes of its own accord.

    http://www.wunderground.com/blog/JeffMasters/comment.html?entrynum=682

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    Re: Our legacy to future generations

    Post  mudra on Fri Sep 21, 2012 9:11 am

    Effects of oil spills

    By Green Living Tips | Published 08/4/2010
    Originally published November 2007, last updated August 2010

    Oil slicks do so much more damage than just the initial havoc we see on the news - the effects can be very long lasting.

    Since first publishing this article in 2007 and even though oil has become even more precious in a world now coming to terms with the fact peak oil is a reality rather than possibility, we've continued to see significant oil leaks and spills occurring on a fairly regular basis.

    The recent Deepwater Horizon BP oil leak disaster in the Gulf of Mexico well and truly eclipsed the Exxon Valdez oil spill of 1989 and now has the dubious distinction of being one of the largest oil spills on record. Latest official estimates (August 2, 2010) state approximately 4.1 million barrels of oil contaminated the ocean.
    Effects of oil spills

    When oil is spilled or leaked into in waterways and the ocean, it spreads very quickly with the help of wind and currents. A single gallon of oil can create an oil slick up to a couple of acres in size! The BP oil slick had spread over 580 square miles in just three days.

    When oil starts mixing in water, it can change composition and becomes what's known as "mousse". This is a sticky substance that clings even more to whatever it comes in contact with. Many marine animals don't know to avoid a slick and some fish may even be attracted to it as it can resemble food.

    Some of the many effects on animals coming into contact with crude oil include:

    - hypothermia and drowning of birds as the oil breaks down the insulating capabilities of feathers, makes them heavier and compromises flying ability

    - hypothermia in some seal pups as the oil destroys insulating fur

    - if oil is ingested, it can either poison the animal outright, make them extremely sick or create a level of toxins in their system that then causes poisoning further up the food chain. Birds and other animals often ingest oil when trying to clean themselves. Shellfish and corals are particularly at risk in these scenarios as they cannot escape from an oil slick.

    - damage to the airways of birds and animals.

    - damage to animal immune systems

    - interruption of breeding and fouling of breeding grounds

    - thinner bird and turtle egg shells and also damage to fish larvae, causing deformities

    - damage to sea grass beds and other shelter/feeding areas

    - tainting of algae, which perform a vital role in waterway ecosystems

    Even once the oil appears to have dissipated, it can still lurk beneath the surface of beaches and the sea bed, severely affecting marine organisms that burrow, such as crabs, for literally decades. These burrowing creatures are also food for other animals, so the cycle of poisoning continues for many years.

    There's really no aspect of a marine and coastal environment that is not in some way adversely affected by an oil spill. The closer the spill occurs to the shoreline, the more pronounced the damage will be due to coastal zones being home to more concentrated and diverse populations of marine, bird and animal life than far out to sea.

    World's biggest oil spills.

    Here's five of the biggest marine spills in history.

    Persian Gulf - January 23, 1991 - up to 1,500,000 tonnes
    Gulf of Mexico - 2010 - approximately 574, 000 tonnes (August estimate)
    Gulf of Mexico - June 3, 1979 - 454,000 - 480,000 tonnes
    Trinidad and Tobago - July 19, 1979 - 287,000 tonnes
    Fergana Valley Uzbekistan - March 2, 1992 - 285,000 tonnes

    read on: http://www.greenlivingtips.com/blogs/164/Effects-of-oil-spills.html

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    Re: Our legacy to future generations

    Post  mudra on Fri Sep 21, 2012 9:19 am

    Oil Pollution in the Baltic Sea and the effets on fish and fisheries

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    Re: Our legacy to future generations

    Post  mudra on Sat Sep 22, 2012 10:25 am

    Office Hours: The State of Our Rivers and Lakes

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AOh0ej5aO6c


    Ken Goldstein talks with limnologist Peter McIntyre about a global study of the condition of our planet's fresh water rivers and lakes.

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    Re: Our legacy to future generations

    Post  Floyd on Sun Sep 23, 2012 2:58 am

    Super cool thread Mudras.

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    Re: Our legacy to future generations

    Post  mudra on Sun Sep 23, 2012 7:14 am

    Floyd wrote:Super cool thread Mudras.

    Gracia
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    Thank You .
    You are welcome to contribute here as you please Floyd Cheerful

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    Re: Our legacy to future generations

    Post  mudra on Sun Sep 23, 2012 7:16 am

    Deadly Secret - Russia

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MbR00_W4gEo


    February 2001 - In Russia, the toll of a terrible nuclear accident is only just emerging after years of official denial and cover-up.
    The truth of what occurred at the Mayak nuclear weapons plant, at the foot of the Ural Mountains, is by any measure appalling. With radioactive pollution far in excess of Chernobyl, the countryside around Mayak, including the village of Muslyumova, has been poisoned. And the people who've been forced to stay there as guinea pigs for the Russian government are dying. But for a long time, they didn't know it. The accident and its staggering after-effects were kept hidden from the villagers - and from the rest of the world - until it was too late.

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    Re: Our legacy to future generations

    Post  mudra on Sun Sep 23, 2012 7:21 am

    CHELYABINSK :
    The Most Contaminated Spot on the Planet


    For forty-five years, Chelyabinsk province of Russia was closed to all foreigners.Only in January of 1992 did President Boris Yeltsin sign a decree changing that.Shortly afterwards, I made my first trip to this region, which later Western scientists declared to be the most polluted spot on earth.

    In the late 1940's, about 80 kilometers north of the city of Chelyabinsk, an atomic weapons complex called "Mayak" was built. Its existence has only recently been acknowledged by Russian officials, though, in fact, the complex, bordered to the west by the Ural Mountains, and to the north by Siberia, was the goal of Gary Powers's surveillance flight in May of 1960.

    The people of the area have suffered no less than three nuclear disasters: For over six years, the Mayak complex systematically dumped radioactive waste into the Techa River, the only source of water for the 24 villages which lined its banks.The four largest of those villages were never evacuated, and only recently have the authorities revealed to the population why they strung barbed wire along the banks of the river some 35 years ago.Russian doctors who study radiation sickness in the area estimate that those living along the Techa River received an average of four times more radiation than the Chernobyl victims.

    In 1957, the area suffered its next calamity when the cooling system of a radioactive waste containment unit malfunctioned and exploded.The explosion spewed some 20 million curies of radioactivity into the atmosphere.About two million curies spread throughout the region, exposing 270,000 people to as much radiation as the Chernobyl victims.Less than half of one percent of these people were evacuated, and some of those only after years had passed.

    The third disaster came ten years later.The Mayak complex had been using Lake Karachay as a dumping basin for its radioactive waste since 1951.In 1967, a drought reduced the water level of the lake, and gale-force winds spread the radioactive dust throughout twenty-five thousand square kilometers, further irradiating 436,000 people with five million curies, approximately the same as at Hiroshima.


    read on: Arrow http://www.logtv.com/films/chelyabinsk/index.htm

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    Re: Our legacy to future generations

    Post  magamud on Sun Sep 23, 2012 9:36 am

    Our legacy will be to light the fire of patriotism and nationalism for the youth of the future.

    They will fall for the predemolitioned patsy infrastructure of our current world and Vow never to repeat how we are living.

    And while they are embracing their new utopia, Tyranny will be more centralized and better hidden...
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    Re: Our legacy to future generations

    Post  Floyd on Mon Sep 24, 2012 5:42 am

    mudra wrote:
    Floyd wrote:Super cool thread Mudras.

    Gracia
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    Thank You .
    You are welcome to contribute here as you please Floyd Cheerful

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    I might just take you up on that offer Mudras Mudras-
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    agroecology

    Post  Floyd on Mon Sep 24, 2012 5:51 am



    Eco farming

    Moving away from pesticides and fertilizers. Natural pest control in the way a small permaculture garden would employ ducks to dine on slugs. It may help to reduce the profits and the impact of companies like Monsanto.
    http://www.agroecology.org


    http://www.guardian.co.uk/environment/2011/mar/08/eco-farming-double-food-output

    A move by farmers in developing countries to ecological agriculture, away from chemical fertilisers and pesticides, could double food production within a decade, a UN report says.

    Insect-trapping plants in Kenya and ducks eating weeds in Bangladesh's rice fields are among examples of recommendations for feeding the world's 7 billion people, which the UN says will become about 9 billion by 2050.

    "Agriculture is at a crossroads," says the study by Olivier de Schutter, the UN special reporter on the right to food, in a drive to depress record food prices and avoid the costly oil-dependent model of industrial farming.

    So far, eco-farming projects in 57 nations demonstrated average crop yield gains of 80 per cent by tapping natural methods for enhancing soil and protecting against pests, it says.

    Recent projects in 20 African countries resulted in a doubling of crop yields within three to 10 years. Those lessons could be widely mimicked elsewhere, it adds.

    "Sound ecological farming can signficantly boost production and in the long term be more effective than conventional farming," De Schutter said of steps such as more use of natural compost or high-canopy trees to shade coffee groves.

    It is also believed "agroecology" could make farms more resilient to extreme weather conditions associated with climate change, including floods, droughts and a rise in sea levels that the report said was already making fresh water near some coasts too salty for use in irrigation.

    Benefits would be greatest in "regions where too few efforts have been put in to agriculture, particularly sub-Saharan Africa," he said. "There are also a number of very promising experiences in parts of Latin America and parts of Asia.

    "The cost of food production has been very closely following the cost of oil," he said. Upheavals in Egypt and Tunisia have been partly linked to discontent at soaring food prices. Oil prices were around $115 a barrel on Tuesday.

    "If food prices are not kept under control and populations are unable to feed themselves ... we will increasingly have states being disrupted and failed states developing," De Schutter said.

    Examples of successful agroecology in Africa include the thousands of Kenyan farmers who planted insect-repelling desmodium or tick clover, used as animal fodder, within corn fields to keep damaging insects away and sowed small plots of napier grass nearby that excretes a sticky gum to trap pests.

    The study also called for better research, training and use of local knowledge. "Farmer field schools" by rice growers in Indonesia, Vietnam and Bangladesh had led to cuts in insecticide use by between 35 and 92 percent, it said.

    De Schutter also recommended a diversification in global farm output, from reliance on rice, wheat and maize.

    Developed nations, however, would be unable to make a quick shift to agroecology because of what he called an "addiction" to an industrial, oil-based model of farming – but a global long-term effort to shift to agroecology was needed.

    It cited Cuba as an example of how change was possible, as the collapse of the Soviet Union in 1991 led to supplies of cheap pesticides and fertilisers being cut off. Yields had risen after a downturn in the 1990s as farmers adopted more eco-friendly methods.
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    Re: Our legacy to future generations

    Post  mudra on Tue Sep 25, 2012 6:49 am

    BACK TO EDEN shares the story of one man’s lifelong journey, walking with God and learning how to get back to the simple, productive methods of sustainable provision that were given to man in the garden of Eden. The organic growing system that has resulted from Paul Gautschi’s incredible experiences has garnered the interest of visitors from around the world. However, never until now have Paul’s methods been documented and shared like this!

    Watch film here: Arrow http://backtoedenfilm.com/

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    Re: Our legacy to future generations

    Post  mudra on Tue Sep 25, 2012 7:01 am

    Floyd wrote:

    Eco farming

    Moving away from pesticides and fertilizers. Natural pest control in the way a small permaculture garden would employ ducks to dine on slugs. It may help to reduce the profits and the impact of companies like Monsanto.
    http://www.agroecology.org


    http://www.guardian.co.uk/environment/2011/mar/08/eco-farming-double-food-output


    Excellent Floyd.
    I hold permaculture in high esteem for it's wiseness and simplicity.
    Working hand in hand with Mother is the way.

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    Re: Our legacy to future generations

    Post  mudra on Tue Sep 25, 2012 8:13 am



    The Dying of the Trees

    The Pandemic in America's Forests

    by Charles E. Little


    From the sugarbush of Vermont and the dogwoods of Maryland's Catoctin Mountains to the forests of the hollows in Appalachia, the oaks and aspens of northern Michigan and the mountainsides and deserts of California, a range of human-caused maladies-- fatal ozone, ultraviolet rays, acid rain, and the disastrous aftermath of clear-cutting--has brought tree death and forest decline.

    In The Dying of the Trees, veteran environmentalist Charles Little explores this phenomenon with scientists, government officials, and citizen leaders and recounts how they have responded (and in many cases failed to respond) to this threat to global ecological balance. What emerges is a fascinating, well-rounded, and sobering account of this disturbing trend, what it forebodes for the future of the Earth, and what must be done to save our trees.

    Visit also Burgundia's thread: Arrow http://www.themistsofavalon.net/t5416-trees-sick-and-dying-everywhere-sept-7-2012

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    Re: Our legacy to future generations

    Post  mudra on Tue Sep 25, 2012 9:07 am


    Hanford Nuclear Reservation

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MohuxjoOPys


    Discussion of the Hanford Nuclear Reservation in Washington State, having the dubious distinction of being the most contaminated toxic site in the western hemisphere.

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    Re: Our legacy to future generations

    Post  mudra on Sat Sep 29, 2012 9:21 am

    A World Without Fish? Save Ocean Predators, Save Their Prey PART 1 of 2

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O1GX0HVh6MM


    A World Without Fish? Save Ocean Predators, Save Their Prey PART 2 of 2

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8TJFDN0TQo4
    [youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8TJFDN0TQo4[/youtube

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    Re: Our legacy to future generations

    Post  mudra on Sat Sep 29, 2012 9:26 am

    Darwins nightmare - Winner Best European Documentary 2004

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6bMnMcAmNvc



    Some time in the 1960's, in the heart of Africa, a new animal was introduced into Lake Victoria as a little scientific experiment. The Nile Perch, a voracious predator, extinguished almost the entire stock of the native fish species. However, the new fish multiplied so fast, that its white fillets are today exported all around the world.

    Huge hulking ex-Soviet cargo planes come daily to collect the latest catch in exchange for their southbound cargo... Kalashnikovs and ammunitions for the uncounted wars in the dark center of the continent.

    This booming multinational industry of fish and weapons has created an ungodly globalized alliance on the shores of the world's biggest tropical lake: an army of local fishermen, World bank agents, homeless children, African ministers, EU-commissioners, Tanzanian prostitutes and Russian pilots.

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    Re: Our legacy to future generations

    Post  mudra on Tue Oct 02, 2012 9:26 am

    CHEMTRAIL HEALTH EFFECTS ON HUMANS AND ENVIRONMENT

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yOdIAAuY9ug


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